Four Unsaid Laws in Nigeria

Share with love:
Digiqole ad

The reality of Nigeria can only be understood when the country is observed from the lens of real-life actions, and not what ought to be. We have a constitution and claim to practice a democratic system of government, but in actuality, our written and unwritten laws are hardly enforced. Rather, we enforce some unsaid laws. I call them unsaid laws because they are not constitutional yet they are practiced daily.

Five Unsaid Laws Observed Nigeria.

  1. The Growth of the Nigerian Citizens is Strongly Prohibited.

Efforts by Nigerians to grow are constantly clogged by the government via policies or lack of social amenities. They thrive by keeping a vast majority poor. That way, people will remain grateful for the crumbs they distribute, and the basic projects they carry out. They want us to continue to wag our tails like starving dogs in front of chewed bones, each time they do the least.  

Recently, cryptocurrency was banned in Nigeria. Trading cryptocurrency is one of the ways many Nigerians have been able to keep their family afloat, yet the government through the CBN called for a ban on cryptocurrency in Nigeria.

download

The world’s richest man Elon Musk bought billions worth of bitcoin as that is the future means of exchange, whereas, Nigeria is banning its citizens from trading on cryptocurrency. Don’t be surprised if these government officials have people abroad trading on cryptocurrency on their behalf. 

SEE ALSO  “God-Fatherism” in Nigerian Politics: When Will We Be Free?

There is no excuse for banning the trade of cryptocurrency in Nigeria. The fact some individuals use crypto as a means of committing fraud does not mean honest Nigerians should be made to suffer. A good government will strive to arrest the fraudsters and not ban the trade. Alas, in Nigeria, The Growth of the Nigerian Citizens is Strongly Prohibited.

Read More: Elon Musk Strikes Again

  1. Demanding Good Governance is a Criminal Offence

In Nigeria, from what is displayed at the Lekki toll gate, demanding good governance and accountability is a criminal offense.

Before the commencement of the protest today, the 13th day of February 2021, the members of the Nigerian police force were captured in videos and photos, being armed and ready for intending protesters.

They kept to their words as there are videos and pictures of them arresting armless protesters and passersby.

In a country where hundreds of people gather for their NIN registration after the deadline was given, protesters are arrested for breaking the Covid-19 rule of not more than 50 people assembling. Is it not in this same Nigeria, political rallies were held during the pandemic?

  1. Protesters are More Harmful Than Terrorists.
SEE ALSO  Surviving Nigeria

Nigeria is a country that arrests protesters, but grants amnesty to terrorists. Members of BOKO HARAM that have terrorized our country for years are granted amnesty, but peaceful protesters are rough handled and detained. Wow! I guess in the unsaid laws of Nigeria, protesters are deemed more harmful than terrorists.

This is our reality, and it is heartbreaking.

  1. Citizens Without Influence, are Humans Without Rights.

The common man is devoid of rights. There have been several cases of innocent Nigerians paraded as criminals because they couldn’t meet the bribe requirements of members of some members of law enforcement agencies.

They say bail is free, but a common man does not experience this gesture. People are kept in prison without trials and are constantly harassed by those meant to preserve our safety and rights. It appears only those with social influence have rights. What a shame!

Finally, the government has proven to be more lawless than words can express. The right to protest is a FUNDAMENTAL HUMAN RIGHT. Yet, without care, the Nigerian government is infringing on this right.

SEE ALSO  Breaking: Fayemi, Others Kicked Out of The APC Over Anti-Party Activities.

In Nigeria, the above Unsaid Laws are practiced way more than the Constitutional laws. Indeed, Nigeria is a tale of ironies.

Read More: Vows in the Mud

Share with love:
Advertisements

Cecilia Wonah

SEE ALSO

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Be the first to see our updates, Subscribe to our Newsletter