Classism and Stereotyping; A Problem of the African Society.

Classism and Stereotyping; A Problem of the African Society.

In a world in which we scream black life matters, our actions are sometimes a reflection that we don’t mean those words. In this age and time where the importance of mental health is preached on a daily, we steadily reek of hypocrisy. In a society in which we complain of SARS and their stereotype, we are actually not better than those we accuse. Truly, we constantly dish hate, but cry when we get a taste of it. Misandrists constantly mask themselves as feminists and end up doing the most.

Fan base is a very important aspect in BBN because it is via votes the winner emerges. Each fan base is not strictly Nigerian, as the show is aired in other African countries. Sadly, these fans and viewers are exhibiting horrifying traits. Like I always say, BBN is a social experiment. The experiment is not just limited to housemates. It further disclosed the mindset of individuals of our society. Some of the horrifying traits are;

Classism.

BBN has shown that a lot of people are actually classist. They discriminate based on social class. Even some so-called celebrities are no better. In fact, former BBA winner Uti is a champion of classism that does not hesitate to body shame.

The love triangle between Erica, Laycon, and Kiddwaya has made people make vile statements mainly because they feel Laycon is not in the same social class as Erica and Kiddwaya. Though Erica has a right to choose Kiddwaya, but shaming Laycon for falling in love because you feel he is from a lower social class is sick and wrong.

In fact, how was it even concluded that Laycon is poor? This unanswered question brings us to the next problem.

Stereotype.

On several occasions in the past, as a country, we have vehemently condemned the stereotype of SARS towards the Nigerian youth. A male with dreads and tattoos is mostly stereotyped as a fraudster. Nevertheless, we often commit this same wrong. Just by Nengi’s appearance, she was stereotyped as a loose girl way early in the show. However, she has proven to be one of the most disciplined, competitive, and well-behaved ladies in the show.

Laycon was equally stereotyped as poor thanks to his stature and appearance. He has never for once stated that he was from a poor home, yet people continue to tag him as poor. This often leaves me speechless. Kiddwaya was equally stereotyped because he was from a rich home. However, he has displayed topnotch maturity and even humility without having to lie about his social status.

Misandrists.

Misandrists hiding under the umbrella of feminism continuously displays toxicity on social media over BBN. They always have one agenda after another against strong male contenders. These women are the first to slut shame their fellow women. However, the moment their favorite begins to taste the heat, they play the gender and victim card. 

As a society, we can do better. This show has exposed us to our own flaws. The ball is in our court to do better.

Major Highlights of the Show this week.

It has been a week of constant winnings for Laycon and Vee.  Laycon, Vee, and Nengi won the Johnny Walker task. Thereby earning a million naira each and an all-expense-paid trip to Scotland. Laycon and Vee were in the same group that won the amatem challenge. 

 Lucy stays throwing tantrums. She refused to be in the same group as Kiddwaya because he said he does not like working with her. This led to an outburst from her closest friends Dorathy and Prince. Well in her own words, they are not her friends.

Still, we meet again keep enjoying the show.

Most Read Posts

5 2 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
4 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Josephus Praise Nyanawreh

You have even started!
There are a lot more waiting for you Great Leader!
Striking truth, most often we hide under the umbrella and perpetual evil…
Thank Leader!

Josephus Praise Nyanawreh

You haven’t**

Chumsy

I don’t watch BBN but the points raised (such as Classism and Stereotyping) make a lot of sense from a neutral point of view. Good read.

Keep it up.

Oyin

Really good read, quite enlightening. Thanks Cecilia

Classism and Stereotyping; A Problem of the African Society.

by Cecilia Wonah time to read: 5 min
4

Be the first to receive our updates

Hit the Subscribe button

You have successfully subscribed to our newsletter

There was an error while trying to send your request. Please try again.

2709 Updates will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing.